From the CRFG Fruit Gardener Jan./Feb. 2001

Fruit Tree and Vine Care Calendar

As we hang up new calendars for the new year, perhaps it is a good time to put our fruit-bearing plants on a calendar schedule as well, This one, produced in October 1993 by Nancy Garrison at the University of California’s Cooperative Extension office in San Jose, California, should be just what the doctor ordered. Gray lines indicate the approximate period for the treatment described.

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP




PRUNE FRUIT TREES 3

WALNUT HUSK FLY SPRAY 11

DORMANT OIL SPRAY 4

CODLING MOTH SPRAYS 10

PRUNE APRICOTS 1

PEACH LEAF CURL SPRAY 5

POWDERY MILDEW GRAPES 12

FERTILIZE 9

PEACH BORER CRYSTALS 14

SHOTHOLE FUNGUS SPRAY 6

FIRE BLIGHT SPRAY 7

FERTILIZE 2

BROWN ROT SPRAY 8

BROWN ROT FOLLOWUP SPRAY 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. With incidence of Eutypa, prune larger limbs of apricots in July or August, well before winter rains Small limbs can be pruned in January. Symptoms are summer limb dieback. Pub. 21182.

2. Often, mature trees do not require fertilization. It trees put out sufficient shoot growth and have good truit set, it may not be necessary to fertilize mature fruit trees. Sandy, rocky, shallow soils tend to require more fertilization. To stimulate more vegetative growth, apply half of fertilizer in February or March and half following harvest.

3. Prune trees during late dormancy, just before they begin to push. Pub. 21171. (See #1 for apricots.)

4. Apply dormant oil spray after completion of pruning, before buds open. Complete coverage essential for effective control of overwintering scale, mealy bugs, whiteflies and mites.

5. Close to, but before bud break, apply bordeaux, Lilly-Miller~s Microcop, Orthos Dormant Disease Control, Cots or Kocide. Remove all mummies and spray ground. Pub. 2613.

 

6. Use fixed coppers (see #5). It’ll also help control peach leaf curl. Pub. 21363 (all stone fruits).

7. Use fixed coppers (above) during bloom. Any blackened twig should be cut off about 9 inches below the infection as soon as seen. Pub. 21262. Susceptible fruits include apples, pears and loquats.

 

8. Apply a fixed copper such as Roverol (Microcop) Captan, Benomyl, sulfur dust or Bordeaux during blossom (stone fruits only). Use no sulfur products on apricots.

9. Apply second half of fertilizer just before a rain or water it in.

 

10. If you’ve had wormy fruit in past years, spray with dipel, diazinon or malathion 10—14 days after petal fall, Repeat 2—3 times at 4-week intervals (apple-pear). For walnuts, spray carbaryl or dipel, when nuts are 1—2 inches in diameter (mid-May) and second spray 7—8 weeks later. Brown-bagging individual fruit clusters after bloom and sealing with a tie excludes moths from laying eggs.

11. Spray malathion between August 1st and 15th, repeating 14 days later, This pest doesn’t affect nutmeat, so you may want to ignore it. Pub. 21021.

12. Apply wettable sulfur, dusting sulfur or 2% soap solution starting at 6 inches of shoot growth, again at 12 and 18 inches, and at 3-week intervals until fruit softening (grapes only). Also thin foliage to increase air circulation.

13. Use benomyl, sulfur dust or wettable sulfur 2—3 weeks before harvest. Use no sulfur products on

apricots.

14.Use a coarse spray of Thiodan applied from crotch of tree, down trunk to soil line. Spray should puddle at base of tree.

Note~ Most information you should need can be found in one publication, Insect and Disease management in the Home Orchard, #21262. All publications can be ordered from the closest county office of the UC Cooperative Extension. Call first to check availability,